Welcome Anonymous !

Login or Register

User Menu

Login

FANS OF THE CONCHORDS

MESSAGE BOARD

The Edinburgh Festivals 2002 - 2004

The place for gigs 2007 and earlier.

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:36 pm

2003 Nominee - Flight of the Conchords: High on Folk - Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement

Image

Now a major sensation the Conchords were once a cult Fringe hit and not everyone could have predicted that this photogenic geek-chic duo, with their gentle banter and deft pieces of comedy pop were going to be a recipe for success. That is exactly what happened of course and their HBO series has turned them and fellow Kiwi Rhys Darby into big stars.

source

#love3# #bret# #jem# #love3#
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:31 pm

Comedy Awards Nominations Congratulated
Thursday, 21 August 2003, 12:19 pm
Press Release: New Zealand Government


New Zealanders congratulated on prestigious Comedy Awards Nominations

Associate Arts Culture & Heritage Minister, Judith Tizard has congratulated New Zealand folk-comedy duo Flight of the the Conchords on their nomination for the prestigious Perrier Comedy Awards at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

“The Flight of the Conchords are obviously masters of their craft. This is a fantastic achievement and it caps off what has been a great year for New Zealand at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Our acts have had a high profile and they have been receiving great reviews at this year’s festival. Being able to perform at this international level is a great opportunity for New Zealand’s performing arts community.”

The Perrier Awards is often a stepping stone to successful international careers and its been won in the past by Richard Hall as Otis Lee Crenshaw (2000), Garth Marenghi’s Netherhead (2001) and Daniel Kitson (2002).

“Congratulations to the Flight of the Conchords duo, Bret MacKenzie and Jemaine Clement and I wish them all the best for the awards” Judith Tizard said.

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:53 pm

Flight of the Conchords
Gilded Balloon

Brian Logan
The Guardian, Tuesday 10 August 2004

Image
'An hour in their company is still sublime': Jermaine Clement and Bret McKenzie, aka the Conchords. Photo: Murdo MacLeod

Last year, "New Zealand's fourth most popular folk parody act" were still late-night Fringe underdogs. This year, they are greeted like rock gods. With their superior wordplay, virtuoso musicality and superbly gormless banter, they've taken comedy song to a whole new level. Their latest collection of tunes isn't as spectacularly funny this year, and the venue is more suited to classical music but there's so much right about Bret McKenzie and Jermaine Clement's act that an hour in their company is still sublime.

The marvel last year was that so many musical styles could be recreated on just two acoustic guitars and a toy glockenspiel. This year, the genre-busting intensifies. Clement smoulders through a sub-Barry White sex serenade called It's Business Time. McKenzie barks along to a swaggering, but ridiculously meaningless, ragga anthem: "Enough small boom, let's boom da boom." The focus is on vocal and musical tricks, although one blissful exception is their cri de coeur for the state of the world, Think About It, which would make Marvin Gaye blush. "One thing we're definitely into," deadpans McKenzie, "is issues."

Their chat is more hilarious than ever. On the blurred lines between stage persona and real self ("I just ask myself what I'd do," says McKenzie, "then do it"), they are profoundly funny. This is dazzling conceptual comedy delivered in the voice of a man reading the gas meter. But their relationship is so strong, and their talent so prodigious, they could probably make that irresistible too.

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 5:31 pm

Show type: Edinburgh Fringe 2002
Starring Comic: Flight Of The Conchords

Folk The World: Flight Of The Conchords
New Zealand's, nay, the World's foremost guitar-based digi-bongo acapella-rap-funk-comedy folk duo sing all of their hits.

You are going to be sceptical about this - I know I was - but two unknown New Zealanders performing a modest spoof on folk music is one of the highlights of this year's Fringe.

That the audience for these undiscovered comedy heroes boasted more performers than the Late and Live bar speaks volumes about the quality of this delightfully funny show, whose word-of-mouth buzz is spreading fast. And rightly so.

The strength is in the beautifully underplayed performance of atmospheric music and killer dialogue, delivered in earnest deadpan.

It's a gloriously silly pastiche interspersed with devastatingly sardonic backchat - all treated entirely seriously, which only heightens the laughs.

Their songs, with titles such as Love Is Like Sellotape and Albee The Racist Dragon, combine deliberately clunky metaphors and beautifully warped logic to fantastic effect.

One favourite - though it's hard to choose a definitive from their subtly hilarious catalogue - is the self-censored rap based around the theme "There's too many mother-uckers -ucking with my shi-"

A French song they attempt is a little too Priorite A Gauche (although avec un certain extra je ne sais quois) and a couple of other numbers fall slightly short of the five comedy stars, though they are all musically wonderful.

These likeable guys dispel any notion that the musical spoof is a moribund comedy form with a real treat of a show. For all their modesty, they are sure to go far.


some comments from 2002 under this article:

Loved the show, Brett and Jermaine are truly talented and had lots of good interest in Edinburgh.Think NZ has just lost them. Their loss is our gain


I like the next one (I'm glad the several big names are as weak as me when it comes to seeing the Conchords #haha# ):

Seems to be the comics' choice this year, with several big names going back five or six times to see it again. It was an almost perfect hour. Funny, beautiful, clever and great. The cult is growing.

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 5:44 pm

Show type: Edinburgh Fringe 2003
Starring Comic: Flight Of The Conchords


Flight Of The Conchords: High On Folk
New Zealand's bad boys of folk are back, and this time they are high. High on folk.

In the world of quickfire comedy, Flight Of The Conchords have a different approach - a slowly smouldering feel that seduces audiences into their twilight world of folk parody.

This Kiwi duo were the underground hit of last year's Fringe, and their failure to make Perrier's best newcomer shortlist was little short of an outrage. But now they're back with an array of new songs, an army of new fans - but the same gloriously low-key banter.

They take a broad approach to what constitutes folk, evoking not only old skool classics like Durham Town, but soul and hip-hop, too, with the splendid, and touchingly naïve, rap Hip-Hopapotomus vs Rhymenoceros a genuine classic.

The songs are delightful, and the lads have fantastic voices, but the real joy is in their deadpan banter, or "clever talking", which quietly mocks every aspect of music and their own obsessions by treating everything with unyielding gravitas. Some of this is immensely subtle, yet nobody misses a single joke - and why would they, the entire audience is always captivated by the Conchords' magic.

There's only one track that doesn't really come off - a Western number about evil gunslinger Stana, but even this contains a fantastic aside as they deconstruct the cliché "this town ain't big enough for the both of us" to the nth degree. A typically inventive touch from two sublime comic minds.

Flight Of The Conchords are a genuinely different, refreshing act with a truly beautiful line in comedy. They deserve every ounce of their cult success.


some comments:

If you miss the magnificence that is Flight Of The Conchords at this years Fringe, you're a folking idiot!


When most folk parody groups are selling out to the mainstream these mother folkers are keepn it real. They prove it ain't about all the money and the hoes.Its about taking Folk Parody to the people.


These dudes are so cool I would let them be ice blocks in my convenience store any day. Folkin aye!


I saw them last year and they were amazing, this year they're even better. Just look at all the comedians beside you in the audience

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Mon Aug 02, 2010 6:15 pm

Show type: Edinburgh Fringe 2004
Starring Comic: Flight Of The Conchords


Flight Of The Conchords: Lonely Knights
Perrier couldabeens Flight Of The Conchords are back with a new show. A cult hit amongst fellow comedians and audiences alike.

The modest brilliance of Bret McKenzie and Jermaine Clement has firmly, and rightly, established them as festival favourites around the world.

And while Flight Of The Conchords bill themselves as New Zealand's fourth most popular folk parody group, it's not just the music, but also the low-key chit-chat between them that has made their show such a delight.

Their 2004 offering, promising 'all new material, all new banter', starts off as meekly as you could possibly imagine, with the murmured first half-syllable of 'hi' being greeted rapturously. This is an act with a fan base, that's for sure.

Then we're straight into the parodies, and a wonderful song about the social awkwardness of meeting someone you can't quite properly recall, hilariously updating the theme behind Lerner and Loewe's I Remember It Well.

With all the energy of a sloth on dope, the pair then reveal their concern for the Issues, without ever quite divulging what those might be, as an introduction to their socially aware song Think About It, a sublime mix of Aids awareness and funk.

What it demonstrates perfectly is the naivety that permeates their act, the innocence that means however well-meaning their intentions or intense their passions, they lack the nous to capture it in song. That gap between intent and execution is where the comedy lies, and these talented pair mine plenty of it.

Take, for example, their tribute to a lover's beauty, which includes such a list of caveats to make it meaningless, too precisely literal in its lyrics to be romantic.

While the songs are as good as anything they've ever done, some of the talk between the tracks isn't quite up to par. The extracts from a spoof radio sci-fi series don't really work, and we keep having to return to it, and the idea of having their spontaneous audience interaction carefully scripted in a tiny notebook seems tired already.

But these are not major parts of the show, and when they let their music do the talking, they are untouchable and it's for this that the fans come.

source


Flight of the Conchords: Lonely Knights


Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie, both from New Zealand, are together known as ‘Flight of the Conchords’. I first heard of them in 2003 when they were selling out the Gilded Balloon Caves and were Perrier Award Nominees.

The praise for this musical comedy duo came from punters, performers, publicity people and the press. They were labeled the comedians comedians and have a large cult following, many people going to the show over and over during a run.

I decided to try and see what the hype was all about.

This year’s show entitled ‘Lonely Knights’ is proving to be as popular as ever. Despite queuing in the damp for twenty five minutes, I can say the show was well worth it, but I feel I didn’t quite get the full impact of last years more intimate venue. The writing genius of the duo is obvious, the sound extremely pleasant, the looks strange but appealing and I look forward to listening in more details to the CD available.

I may be following the flock, sheepishly being fleeced for the cost of the ticket and CD. Yet I wouldn’t send either of these two away should they arrive in a suit of armour on a white charger.

source


They also performed this program at Soho Theatre, London for ten sold-out nights. It was their first London run. #love3#

Flight of the Conchords

New Zealand's fourth most popular folk parody duo.
8 - 18 September 2004


Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie chat and sing their way through a series of original songs that celebrate the unlikely and the preposterous to equally rollicking effect.

Nominated, Perrier Award, Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2003.
Nominated, Barry Award, Melbourne Comedy Festival 2003 .
Best Newcomers, Melbourne Comedy Festival 2003 .

'It's a rare act that unites audiences, critics and comedians... Flight of the Conchords are just such an act.'
The Independent

'a deliciously witty tapestry of mickey-taking songs and dead-pan banter.'
The Telegraph

'Greeted like rock gods... with their superior wordplay, virtuoso musicality and superbly gormless banter, they've taken comedy songs to a whole new level.'
The Guardian

'Not one slack moment, not a moment that doesn't incite a grin, giggle or gasp.'
The Scotsman

Soho Theatre
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:23 am

Edinburgh reports: sonic boomtime

Published: 11 Aug 2004

Mark Monahan reviews Flight of the Conchords at Reid Hall

If there were an award for driest act on the Fringe, musical parodists Flight of the Conchords would soar away with it.

Like their Edinburgh debut, which went effortlessly on to 2003's Perrier shortlist, the New Zealand singing and guitar-playing duo's follow-up, Lonely Knights, is a deliciously witty tapestry of mickey-taking songs and deadpan banter.

As perfectly complementary a double act as there's ever been, Bret McKenzie (slightly edgy, the straight-man by a whisker) and Jemaine Clement (hirsute, bespectacled, laconic) are continuting with their demolition of pretty much every convention of modern songwriting and performing.

Take the opening number, an amnesiac Ah Yes, I Remember it Well that features an exchange between two long-separated lovers, its lyrical banality supremely at odds with the technically flawless guitar-plucking and passionate delivery.

There are countless other pleasures. Their "issues song" features the Dylanesque and very Kiwi couplet, "Living in the city is ugly and cheap, /Living in the country there are too many sheep"; euphemistic Barry White-ish bedroom number It's Business Time has Jemaine growling: "You go and brush your teeth - that's part of it, it's foreplay"; and She's So Hot - Boom! is a pin-sharp faux-ragga number.

source


Celebrity choice: Dmitri Martin, comedian

"I did a show with Flight of the Conchords in New York recently, and I love their new songs. Describing them as two guys with guitars doing electronic songs does not do them justice: there's something original and brilliant about how they're funny.

"It's subtle, but it's also committed. Mixing music and comedy is a dangerous recipe, but they pull it off."

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Wed Aug 04, 2010 10:24 am

Who will win comedy's top prize?

Mark Monahan
Published: 18 Aug 2004

Image
Perrier contenders: Flight of the Conchords

This year, the field is wide open for the festival's Perrier award, says Mark Monahan

By this time last year, with the Fringe settling into its second week, like many observers, I had a pretty shrewd idea who the Perrier judges had their eyes on. Right from the start, Edinburgh had been rippling with talk of Demetri Martin, the hot-shot Yale drop-out with a penchant for palindromes, as well as the guitar-playing Conchords and a number of other names.

When Martin walked away with the main prize (pipping Adam Hills, Howard Read, Reginald D Hunter and the mighty Conchords), and ersatz New Romantic Gary Le Strange (aka Waen Shepherd) was voted best newcomer, no one was very surprised.

And this year's buzz? Nothing. Nada. Zilch. Repeated talks with fellow journos, comedians and even PRs (whom you would expect to be banging drums for their acts) are admitting that no one has the faintest idea what's going to happen, and that the main prize is almost entirely open. Which is frustrating but arguably more fun, too.

The point is that, broadly speaking, 2003's best acts are also the stand-outs this year. Martin's win and Hills's subsequent gigs in 500-plus-seater venues have taken them out of the running, and Hunter's hour seems a climb-down from last year's. But Shepherd has honed his creation splendidly since last August, Howard Read (the nominee who escaped me) is up to more splendid, high-tech mischief with miniature animated sidekick Little Howard, and the Conchords are once again soaring.

/.../

I've been recommending Jeremy Lion and Count Arthur Strong, but no act has made me laugh as long or hard as Flight of the Conchords. Their demolition of every pop-music and stand-up convention is so dry, merciless and charming that, this year, there has really been no one to touch them.

/.../

source

But the absence [among the nominees] of both Andrew Maxwell and Brendon Burns seems a pity, and that of Flight of the Conchords' Lonely Knights and Jeremy Lion's Happy Birthday! a travesty.

source

This year's Perrier prize nominations rewarded some Fringe veterans and some relative newcomers, but found no space for hotly-tipped New Zealanders Flight of the Conchords.
/.../
The Guardian's comedy critic Brian Logan said the absence of the Flight of the Conchords, and fellow critics' darling Jeremy Lion, was "mildly surprising, but not a serious outrage".

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Wed Aug 04, 2010 11:31 am

Flight of the Conchords
present
FOLK THE WORLD


Verdict: hilarious songs and stand-up


Edinburgh - Gilded Balloon Cave 1 - August 02

Flight of the Conchords are Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie - two New Zealand guitarists / singers - and the secret surprise of the Fringe. Well, surprise to most, but not to pretty Anna from Edinburgh, sitting next to us with her mates. They'd already been a few times. And the applause that met every song in the Conchords's tight, funny set, suggested they'd a new army of fans in Edinburgh, or flown a plane-load over from Wellington.

Clement and McKenzie kick off with Lost and Lonely at Sea, probably the most offensive cannibal sea-shanty to find its way into maritime lore, setting the tone for the excellently subtle filth and squalor to follow. There's romance with office stationery in The Cellotape of Love ('The kind of love that's double-sided'), mouths - A kiss is not ..., and no-holds-barred office lust in the glorious Leggy Blonde.

It's back to the 70's as the Conchords explore their previously-unknown influence on David Bowie. Bowie's in Space catches the lyric style and voice of the master to perfection ('You should hear his parody of us'). Albee the Racist Dragon sees Albee mending his naughty ways. In Tony the Bus Driver an embittered driver narrates his loss of life-chances to his captive passenger-audience. Taxi drivers take note. Conchords continue their philosophical analysis with the self-explanatory Too Many Motherfuckers. Keyboard player David joins them on stage for the French Song, which starts with Je t'aime and degenerates ('le coq sportif') excellently. It's safe to say no-one French will understand a word of this one. David leaves, and the Conchords are back on their own with an All Around the World finale. For an encore they do Angels, and it's not Robbie Williams.

Flight of the Conchords delivers a combination of stand-up (well, sit-down) comedy and fine close-harmony singing that's a delight, and gloriously funny. It's a blissful entertainment, skillfully delivered by fine and charismatic artists.

Written, performed and directed by Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie. Keyboard - David. Technical management - Gilded Balloon staff.

Footnote: Anyone puzzled by shouts of 'Figwit' at Conchords gigs may like to know that Brett McKenzie is also famous world-wide for a 3-second appearance in Lord of The Rings (Council of Elrond scene). Rings fanatics have named the character 'Figwit', and a film crew follows the bemused McKenzie round Edinburgh.

END

John Park

reviewed Saturday 24 August 02 / Gilded Balloon Cave 1

source
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

by emira » Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:50 pm

How could I forget about this source? #haha#

/.../

In 2002 they decided to again escape the New Zealand winter. This time traveling to Scotland to perform in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Their venue was an underground tunnel called The Cave. When it rained, which was most days in Edinburgh, the ceiling dripped onto the audience and a dank slime crept down the stone walls. Apparently in the 17th century the room had been used to quarantine plague victims. They performed every night for the month of August and won the Mervyn Stutter Spirit of the Fringe Award. By the time the left they had dozens of fans, and severe chest infections.

/.../

They returned to Edinburgh in 2003 and again performed in the same subterranean grotto. The show had developed to include a xylophone and a dancing toy flower. Their new songs included If You’re Into it, Bret You’ve Got It Goin’ On, Sexy Flower, and Hiphopopotamus vs. The Rhymenocerous.

/.../

In 2004 they returned to Edinburgh this time performing above ground. The sell out show included the songs Jenny, Business Time, Stana and an unfinished love song called The Scientist and the French Teacher.

/.../
emira
You can't break this heart...
 
Posts: 9810
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 6:42 am
Location: the COO of Doggy Bounce

Previous

Return to Conchords Live!